Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany by Rogers Brubaker

By Rogers Brubaker

The adaptation among French and German definitions of citizenship is instructive - and, for thousands of immigrants from North Africa, Turkey, and japanese Europe, decisive. Rogers Brubaker explores this distinction - among the territorial foundation of the French citizenry and the German emphasis on blood descent - and exhibits the way it interprets into rights and regulations for hundreds of thousands of would-be French and German voters.

Show description

Read Online or Download Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany PDF

Best civics & citizenship books

Governance in Contemporary Germany: The Semisovereign State Revisited

A lot has replaced in Germany over the last two decades. In 1987 Peter Katzenstein produced a seminal research of the 'semisovereign' politics of West Germany, delivering a compelling account of policy-making in Europe's greatest economic climate. despite the fact that, unification in 1990 replaced Germany's institutional configuration extensively, and created monetary demanding situations on an important scale.

The Politics of Home: Belonging and Nostalgia in Europe and the United States

This e-book addresses trendy debates in Western Europe and the us on subject matters as likely assorted as nationwide identification and nostalgia, migration and integration, gender kin and 'caring communities'. on the so much primary point, all of those debates care for the fitting to belong and the power to 'feel at home'.

Belonging to America: Equal Citizenship and the Constitution

Who're the genuine electorate of the United States? which individuals really qualify for equality lower than the legislation? 200 years in the past, a decent solution to those questions may have excluded not just girls, slaves, and Indians, but in addition Germans, Scotch-Irish, Catholics, and Jews. but the announcement of Independence expresses a profound dedication to the correct of equivalent citizenship.

Extra info for Citizenship and Nationhood in France and Germany

Example text

Ethnocultural closure may be structured either way: it may be exercised against ethnic or religious outsiders defi ned residually (non-European, nonwhite, non-Christian, non-Anglophone), or directly (Asian, Black, Jew, Spanish-speaking). The noncitizen is a residually defi ned outsider. Every modern state defi nes its citizens positively, in accordance with explicit, formally articulated criteria, and its noncitizens residually. Insider-outsider groupings may have a narrower or a wider interactional and temporal span.

Ethnocultural closure may be structured either way: it may be exercised against ethnic or religious outsiders defi ned residually (non-European, nonwhite, non-Christian, non-Anglophone), or directly (Asian, Black, Jew, Spanish-speaking). The noncitizen is a residually defi ned outsider. Every modern state defi nes its citizens positively, in accordance with explicit, formally articulated criteria, and its noncitizens residually. Insider-outsider groupings may have a narrower or a wider interactional and temporal span.

The emergence of clearly defi ned and sharply bounded citizenries in response to the imperatives of the modern state-system can be seen clearly in early-nineteenth-century Germany. After 1815 there were thirty-nine sovereign German states, linked in a loose confederation and sharing an increasingly integrated economy and a relatively homo- Citizenship as Social Closure ♦ 27 geneous culture. Given the large number of small states, migration within Germany, even over relatively short distances, often crossed state boundaries.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.61 of 5 – based on 31 votes